Federal

Bill C-45 headed to the Senate

By | November 28, 2017

Last night, Proposed Bill C-45, also known as the “Cannabis Act”, was passed by MPs by a vote of 200-82, which brings it one step closer towards legalization.  Now that the Bill has cleared the house, it will be sent to the Senate where it will undergo a similar process of being studied, debated and ultimately approved.

The Bill was first introduced in the House of Commons back in April. The legislative process and timeline of Bill C-45 in the House of Commons is demonstrated in an infographic here

At the House of Commons, among other amendments made to the Bill, two exciting ones are of note:

Plant Height Restrictions on Grow your Own

The Bill initially set a 100 cm height cap on cannabis plants to be grown by recreational users in their homes. This provision was met with significant criticism and was met with concerns about the reality of enforcement.  On October 3, 2017, HESA approved an amendment removing the 100 cm height limitation.  The four plant limit is unaffected by the removal of the height restriction.

Edibles

On October 3, 2017, HESA also voted for an amendment to allow cannabis edibles and other concentrated forms of cannabis to be available by no later than one year after the time that the legal recreational market comes into force. The Federal government had always maintained that it would introduce edibles, but this amendment set a concrete deadline, which resounded most favourably with those involved or interested in the industry.

Once the Bill completes its process in both the House of Commons and the Senate, and both pass an identical version of the Bill, the Bill will receive Royal Assent and become law.  The date on which the law comes into force will be the day of Royal Assent unless there is a provision stating that the act or a portion of the Act comes into force on a specific day or a day fixed by an order of the Governor-in-Council.

Continue to check Canada Cannabis Legal for updates of what happens with Bill C-45 at the Senate.


Comments (3)

  1. Jules:
    Dec 29, 2018 at 12:53 AM

    Fascinating article. Very in depth. My one question is: from where would Canada import cannabis? Are there countries currently exporting cannabis legally? Uraguay seems like the most economical source, although shipping costs could be an issue.

  2. miss lena:
    Feb 24, 2019 at 01:52 PM


    All labels will need to be plain, not appealing to children, and make no health claims. For edibles, there may be no dietary claims, and for topicals, there may be no cosmetic claims. For all of the new product classes, packaging and labelling must not contain any elements that associate the product with an alcoholic beverage, alcohol, or an alcohol brand.

  3. miss lena:
    Feb 24, 2019 at 01:52 PM

    All labels will need to be plain, not appealing to children, and make no health claims. For edibles, there may be no dietary claims, and for topicals, there may be no cosmetic claims. For all of the new product classes, packaging and labelling must not contain any elements that associate the product with an alcoholic beverage, alcohol, or an alcohol brand.






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