Provincial

Senate Bill S-230 Defeated at Second Reading in the House of Commons

By Whitney Abrams | October 27, 2017

Senate Bill S-230, also known as the Drug-Impaired Driving Detection act (“DIDDA”) was first introduced in the Canadian Senate in October, 2016 and was put through its First Reading in the House of Commons on February 9, 2017.

Yesterday, at its second reading at the House of Commons, the Bill was defeated.  DIDDA would have amended the Criminal Code to allow use of roadside screening devices to detect the presence of drugs in impaired drivers.

This is likely due to the introduction of Bill C-46 , known as the Impaired Driving Act, which will change provisions relating to drug-impaired driving and create new offences.  Bill C-46 was tabled in May, 2017 and will serve as a replacement for DIDDA.  Bill C-46 has been the subject of much debate. Specifically, the constitutionality of the Bill has been called into question.  This has necessitated a Charter Statement from the Minister of Justice, which is designed to examine the Bill and its consistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. 

The Charter Statement reviews the possible ways that Bill C-46 may engage the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Charter, including Section 7 rights to Life, Liberty and Security of the Person; Section 8 Searches and Seizures; and Section 11 Presumption of Innocence.

As of today, Bill C-46 is in its third reading at the House of Commons.


Whitney Abrams

Whitney Abrams

Whitney’s work focuses on providing regulatory advice and advocating on behalf of cannabis businesses in the North American market. She is a frequent contributor to Canada Cannabis Legal.
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Comments (3)

  1. Jules:
    Dec 29, 2018 at 12:53 AM

    Fascinating article. Very in depth. My one question is: from where would Canada import cannabis? Are there countries currently exporting cannabis legally? Uraguay seems like the most economical source, although shipping costs could be an issue.

  2. miss lena:
    Feb 24, 2019 at 01:52 PM


    All labels will need to be plain, not appealing to children, and make no health claims. For edibles, there may be no dietary claims, and for topicals, there may be no cosmetic claims. For all of the new product classes, packaging and labelling must not contain any elements that associate the product with an alcoholic beverage, alcohol, or an alcohol brand.

  3. miss lena:
    Feb 24, 2019 at 01:52 PM

    All labels will need to be plain, not appealing to children, and make no health claims. For edibles, there may be no dietary claims, and for topicals, there may be no cosmetic claims. For all of the new product classes, packaging and labelling must not contain any elements that associate the product with an alcoholic beverage, alcohol, or an alcohol brand.






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